Experience : Disability Not Always Inability

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A high percentage of kids are born with various disorders. These disorders are different for different kids. Different parents react differently to having disabled kids. Most cases of disorders in kids are natural whereas a few of them could be induced by some circumstances such as the type of prenatal care that the parents had.
Most mothers, especially young mothers normally have high expectations of getting fully normal kids. They have great plans of the kind of life they will give to their young ones as soon as they are born. Unfortunately, after giving birth some parents are struck by the fact that their babies aren’t fully normal like they expected. Some parents get it hard to accept this truth and therefore tend to neglect their kids or even themselves.

Disability is not something that anyone could wish for their kids or anyone related to them. Some cases of disability turn out to be a gift that normal people could not acquire. Learning how to treat your disabled kid right is not easy especially for young mothers. . There is this friend of mine, Julie who made me realize how it really feels when you get your first kid only to be shocked with them being disabled.

Julie got pregnant at a very young age of 17. Despite the fact that the pregnancy was unplanned for, Julie loved kids and was willing to keep the pregnancy and she did. As the pregnancy developed, Julie got more eager to give birth to her baby. Every day she wished that days could come by faster to the day that she would deliver her baby. I know this is something that happens to every expectant mothers especially the young mothers at their first or second pregnancies. The anxiety to deliver gets stronger day by day.

Finally the day for Julie to deliver came. Julie, so happy and eager to see her baby. “I did not believe what the doctor said. I really thought I was dreaming and it sucked to have such a dream. Well, it wasn’t a dream.” Said Julie. “The doctor diagnosed that my kid had a rare birth defect called Myelomeningocele Spina Bifida”. Explained Julie. Julie was instructed to christen him in the hospital right after birth due to the fear that he could not survive.

The doctor added that even if for some reasons or the kid miraculously survived, he could never walk, talk and chances were that he would have everlasting cognitive disorders. Julie felt so low. She did not understand why that was happening to her. At some point she even had the thought that she was cursed. Pretty sure you would have the same feelings too. All the anxiety, the wishes and hope of getting a normal kid were just empty.
The baby was named Mark and did not only survive, he thrived! He grew though he was always a late bloomer. He was always slow and had difficulties interacting with other kids. Julie did not give up on Mark. She always did the best for him and had hopes that one day, Mark will have a normal life just like other kids. With time, Mark’s condition developed to an autistic condition. He had poor communication skills.
It is unbelievable how Mark started drawing sketches of things. He started doing this at an age of 5 years. He could draw a replica of anything, be it insects, people and other stuff. Mark developed his art skills and nobody needed to be told that he is good in drawing. It was so clear. Mark is one of the best artists in drawing. He can draw anything.
This made me realize that disability is not inability and it is something that could develop to a gift that is outstanding among many. If you get a kid who has some disabilities, treat them right and nurture them with the best care you can. Some day they could be the greatest people around you.



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